On the Next Represent NYC: What’s Next for New York?

The November 6th Midterm Elections gave Democratic Party a boost, but is it enough to protect New York City? 

On this episode of “Represent NYC,” New York Times Reporter Jeff C. Mays, and Politico Reporter Brendan Cheney chat with Julie Walker about the Midterm Election results. How will the divided tunnel play out in Washington D.C. for women’s rights, minority representation, and how will President Trump work with the House? 

Miss an episode of Represent NYC? Watch all past episodes here.

Originally aired November 21, 2018

 

READ THE TRANSCRIPT FOR THIS EPISODE

 

On the Next Represent NYC: What’s Next for New York?

Julie Walker, Jeff Mays & Brendon Cheney

Airdate November 21st

 

DISCLAIMER: Please be advised that this transcription was done from a audio recording by an out of house

service; therefore the accuracy of the transcript may be impacted. If there is an issue please contact MNN info@mnn.org.



10:21:24 Jeff Mays: Governor Andrew Cuomo recently labeled himself as a progressive, and I think that now is his time to prove himself.



10:22:10 Brendan Cheney: Governor Cuomo wasn’t able to do things before because Republicans were in charge, but now he has to find a way to say yes because he doesn’t want to look less progressive. 

 

10:22:34 Jeff Mays: Now that we have this majority, people want things the governor has been reluctant on to get moving. You get the sense that he isn’t in favor of single paid health care as described by people.

 

10:22:10 Brendan Cheney: Governor Cuomo wasn’t able to do things before because Republicans were in charge, but now he has to find a way to say yes because he doesn’t want to look less progressive.

 

10:24:48 Jeff Mays: With Kavanaugh in the court, there is going to be a lot of pressure, but even in New York, things like woman’s reproductive rights are at stake.

 

10:25:50 Jeff Mays: I think [Letitia James] has a huge challenge ahead of her. It’s a really important office, and so while it was easy during the campaign to talk tough about Trump, now she’s going to have to actually put that into action.

 

10:27:15 Julie Walker: Now, with Letitia James leaving the New York City Public Advocate seat up for grabs, a lot of people, at least 8 people have mentioned that they are interested in running, including [Daniel] O’Donnell.

 

10:28:36 Jeff Mays: I think there’s a lot of voter fatigue because it was such a compact election period, and specially with the problems you saw here in New York at the polls.

 

10:30:02 Julie Walker: Here in New York, we were given 3 questions to vote for, a lot of people didn’t know, but overwhelmingly voted “yes” to all three of them.



10:35:17 Jeff Mays:New York is definitely making a statement about where their political leanings are.

10:36:23 Jeff Mays:Trump is really angry right now. He’s going out and angrily attacking people, answering questions about the Robert Muller case. Now the question is, are voters going to respond to that?

 

10:37:15 Brendan Cheney: I believe the real question right now is, “is Trump really going to be able to work with Democrats, the budgets, and the big infrastructure plans? Can he actually handle the divided tunnel?”



10:39:14 Jeff Mays: The issue is, should New York City and New York State be giving the richest corporation in the world subsidies in terms of money and land. […] I think it’s going to say a lot about May De Blasio and Governor Cuomo, who are calling themselves progressive by the fact that they are giving them these subsidies.

 

10:44:03 Jeff Mays: I think it’s going to be interesting with this new base of women in Congress and African American women take on these women’s rights issues: equal pay, reproductive rights, etc.