Youth Media Center

Established in March 2000, Manhattan Neighborhood Network's Youth Media Center (YMC) develops 21st Century communicators and participants in social justice.
 
The Youth Media Center offers Manhattan residents ages 14 to 25 free video production training, along with the opportunity to produce critical media on important youth issues for MNN's award-winning Youth Channel, which airs weeknights from 6:00 pm to 7:00 pm on MNN4: TWC 67, RCN 85, FiOS 36, and streaming live on MNN.org.
 

In early 2012, the Youth Media Center moved to the MNN El Barrio Firehouse Community Media Center.

 

Youth media makers are invited to share the critical conversations they're having by submitting programming to air during MNN's Youth Channel programming block.
MNN's Youth Media Center offers a variety of classes and workshops for aspiring media makers to produce critical content in a rapidly changing media landscape.
The YMC partners with the NYC Department of Youth and Community Development for the Summer Youth Employment Program (SYEP).
The Youth Channel is looking for journalists and media makers ages 18-24 who are passionate about reporting on community news to join our digital journalism team.

YMC Social Media

YMC Facebook YMC Twitter YMC Youtube

YMC News

The Youth Channel covers the recent “Beyond Knowing your Rights” event—where community leaders, lawyers, and family members who’ve lost others to police violence gathered in prayer, remembrance, and information-sharing.
As part of a semester-long project, Youth Channel Community Journalist Janet Perez contributes a video and accompanying story spotlighting the Kingsbridge Armory redevelopment project.
“#Hands Up #Don’t Shoot” features the El Puente Arts Forum as young artists use their media to protest recent police brutality.
The Youth Channel interviews formerly incarcerated youth and community leaders advocating for reform of an outmoded penal system.
Watch compelling YC coverage of the 12/17 art exhibit in tribute to the 43 Mexican students kidnapped and burned alive by police in Ayotzinapa. Artists from around the globe fabricated a “virtual quilt” to protest human rights violations by law enforcement officials on both sides of the US/Mexican border and elsewhere.

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